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Gov. Paterson defends Alton Maddox

Alton H.Maddox | , Jr. | 4/12/2011, 4:38 p.m.

On July 11, 1984, the Manhattan District Attorney's office had already charged me with beating up two court officers who were administering a beating on my client, Willie Bosket. Self-defense was not an option. The no-sock law prohibits self-defense when the assailant is a peace officer.

The jury nullified the court's illegal instructions and acquitted me of the criminal charges. In the 18th century, the U.S. Supreme Court had sanctioned jury nullification. The shoe would finally drop on May 21, 1990. I was permanently "suspended" from the practice of law.

Mr. Paterson is no dummy. He correctly described the motivation for the attacks on me as racial because "they don't like Black people and they want us to lose." Whites will allow Black activists to spew racial rhetoric to appease Blacks, but a cycle of failure must follow the rhetoric. I was defending Black people outside the lines.

This past Tuesday was the first anniversary of Mr. Paterson taking over the reins of New York. As a gubernatorial oathtaker, he swore to uphold the Constitution. I spent my career seeking to enforce the Constitution. Yet, there appears to be a disconnect between myself and Mr. Paterson, who, until January 2006, was my actual political representative in the New York Senate.

History has proven that a Black person will be punished for simply enforcing the Constitution. In "Howard Beach" and "Bensonhurst," Blacks were entitled to enjoy the right to travel. Jonah Perry, Anthony Davis and Andre Nichols were entitled to fair trials. Sam Brown of the Black Liberation Army was entitled to medical treatment. The actual list is much longer. Yet, it would add up to my disbarment. "No Negro has any rights that whites are bound to respect." This is still good law in 2009. Dred Scott was decided by the judicial branch of government and it is beyond the reach of President Barack Hussein Obama, who must enforce Supreme Court decisions.

Because the ratification of the 14th Amendment was flawed, Dred Scott is still the law of the land. See the ratification of the 14th Amendment in New Jersey and Ohio. Georgia honored its compelled ratification in the breach. Black representatives were chased from the Georgia Legislature.

Because the ratification of the 14th Amendment was flawed, it stands to reason that any Black person who seeks to enforce the Reconstruction Amendments is committing acts of insurrection. The exercise of civil rights by Blacks is akin to overthrowing the "original intent"of the U.S. Constitution.

This explains the assassinations of Harry and Harriette Moore, Rev. George Lee, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, Jimmie L. Jackson and Dr. Martin L. King Jr. Obviously, our trek to the "Promised Land" amounts to a trespass. We are, in fact, constitutional squatters. Mr. Paterson is seeking to have his cake and eat it too. He is running with the hares and hunting with the hounds. In the end, he loses. As Dr. King said, "If a man does not stand for something, he will fall for anything." Only white racists will punish Mr. Paterson for doing the right thing. Blacks will stand by their man.