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Mets fire Bernazard, but GM takes shot at reporter

Marcus Henry | 4/12/2011, 4:38 p.m.

Just when you think you've seen and heard everything.

The Mets, Omar Minaya in particular, turned a layup into a full court heave on Monday when he accused Daily News sportswriter Adam Rubin of tearing down his friend, assistant GM / VP of player development Tony Bernazard so he could get a job with the team.

Monday's task was simple. Fire Bernazard and be done with it. Instead of taking the easy way out, which everyone was expecting. Minaya opted to start a war with the Daily News.

The first thought for media members who witnessed the press conference was that there's no way this could be the same Minaya who's respected throughout baseball. Baseball people and media members alike all had good thoughts of Minaya. Those good feelings all but evaporated (at least for the media) when Minaya dropped his bomb on Monday.

To accuse a reporter of intentionally putting out a factual report just to get a job is the ultimate cop-out. We all know Bernazard's days were numbered after Rubin's story, detailing some of the ex-ball player's tirades, was published. Bernazard's history of berating employees and players was widely known. What kept him in the Mets employ was that none of this ever hit print or the airwaves.

Things finally boiled over when he took his shirt off and allegedly challenged a player with the Mets Double-A affiliate in Binghamton to a fight. Rubin had Bernazard dead to rights. Knowing Rubin, there's no way he would've done something like that to get a job. What sense does that make?

Minaya's shot at Rubin during his press conference on Monday (July 27) was payback. You got one of my guys, now I get one of yours.

Minaya's attempt at an apology was late and lame. "I stand by the things I said," said Minaya, who along with Mets CEO met with reporters in the press box minutes before Monday's game. "I regret saying it in that forum."

When asked if he would reach out to Rubin, Minaya said: "possibly".

Unbelievable. The man attempts to ruin the career of a respected journalist and can barely apologize. Don't get me wrong. The media is far from perfect. From the New York Post putting photos of Erin Andrews on its front page to former New York Times report Jayson Blair's scandals, the media certainly has its demons.

But what Rubin did was far from wrong or evil. He simply stated the facts. Minaya even admitted Bernazard was not a popular person."Is he the most well-liked person? No," Minaya said during the press conference.

For Minaya to go after Rubin when he knows Bernazard was wrong was disgusting.

The Mets have had their share of embarrassing moments. This one might be at the top of the heap.

Questions or comments: Marcus can be reached atmahen26@aol.com