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Brian White and David E. Talbert on 'What My Husband Doesn't Know'

Special to AmNews | , Linda Armstrong | 5/25/2011, 9:23 a.m.

AmNews: What aspects of your character were a challenge?

White: My character takes his shirt off every night. When you're on the road and trying to figure out how to eat right and get to the gym--it's hard to figure it out when you're working 16-hour days and trying to find fat-free foods. On stage, the second act is very dramatically charged for my character and we do four shows on the weekends, so I have to make sure to keep up my energy.

AmNews: What do you get from doing live theater?

White: I want to put positive, upscale images up for our Black people. I also get to hone my craft as an actor. I'm stronger and more prepared now. The main reason I did this was to bond with David, and the opportunity to meet the people who support me--we shake hands, talk to people and hug people.

AmNews: What should audiences expect if they come to see "What My Husband Doesn't Know"?

White: Fireworks. You're going to see myself, Clifton Davis, Michelle Williams, Morris Chestnut and Ann Nesby in one of Talbert's best productions. Audiences should expect to laugh like they've never laughed before. Expect fireworks between Morris and I. After every show we come out to the lobby and we sign programs. I have calendars out and I take pictures with people with their cameras when they buy one. It's definitely a time for us to meet the fans.

White has several projects coming up. To keep up with his work, go to Brianwhiteonline.com or follow him on Twitter at @actorbrianwhite.

AmNews: What's it like to be around for a 20th anniversary in the theater?

David E. Talbert: It feels good. When I look at all the stuff, I'm in awe myself. I'm just thankful for being given this gift and doing it for so long.

AmNews: Why was "What My Husband Doesn't Know" the play you wanted to do for this 20th anniversary year?

Talbert: It's mixed media, a mixture of film, television and novels all wrapped up in one. It's like watching a movie, seeing a play and hearing a novel.

AmNews: Brian White is making his theater debut with this show. How do you feel about that?

Talbert: I've been fortunate enough to catch men on their way up, like Malik Yoba, Morris Chestnut--you name it. So it's always great. It's like this special twinkle I see in their eyes and I'm honored to be a part of that experience with them.

AmNews: Over 20 years you've written five novels, a Talbert: It's mixed media, a mixture of film, television and novels all wrapped up in one. It's like watching a movie, seeing a play and hearing a novel.

AmNews: Brian White is making his theater debut with this show. How do you feel about that?

Talbert: I've been fortunate enough to catch men on their way up, like Malik Yoba, Morris Chestnut--you name it. So it's always great. It's like this special twinkle I see in their eyes and I'm honored to be a part of that experience with them.