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Cop pleads not guilty in Ramarley Graham shooting

Special to AmNews | , Hannington Dia | , Ja'Peth Toulson | 6/14/2012, 2:42 p.m.
Cop pleads not guilty in Ramarley Graham shooting

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Cop pleads not guilty in Ramarley Graham shooting

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Cop pleads not guilty in Ramarley Graham shooting

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Cop pleads not guilty in Ramarley Graham shooting

Richard Haste, the officer who fatally shot Ramarley Graham in February, was arraigned at the Bronx Criminal Courthouse Wednesday morning, pleading not guilty to manslaughter charges. Haste made a $50,000 bond that day.

Outside the courthouse, protestors from both sides gathered. Community activists took the opportunity to target Haste and his supporters during the proceedings. Even though the indictment was a victory for some, others weren't as happy.

"I'm not pleased about it," said Alicia Harrington, holding a poster of Graham as she stood in a barricaded section for protestors outside the courthouse. "I feel that it shouldn't be manslaughter. It should be murder. He definitely murdered Ramarley in front of his grandmother, his 6-year-old brother. You see them: gun drawn, Ramarley's walking in. You kick in the door. This was premeditated."

But Haste's supporters on the other side disagreed. "There was a loss of life, and we respect the grief that their family feels," said Patrolman's Benevolent Association President Patrick Lynch soon after Haste left the courthouse. "Anyone who loses a child or a family member has that grief. We respect that. Police officers are put in difficult situations each and every day. In this case, this police officer thought there was a weapon."

Shortly thereafter, Graham's family took to the microphones. "Is it the start I'm looking for? No, but it's a start," said Franclot Graham, his father. "Ramarley is not coming home. We won't have him for Father's Day. I keep asking, 'Why did he kill our son?'"

As he burst into tears before he could continue, Constance Malcolm took over for her husband. "We have too much of this going on and it has to stop. We need this to stop. We can't keep killing our kids. Something has to come out of this. We have to stand together to make this work."

Community activism surrounding the case has been ongoing. Family, friends and community members held a rally for the slain Bronx youth outside City Hall last Friday. In remembrance of the 18-year-old unarmed Jamaican youth who was chased and shot to death in his own bathroom by police officers, "Ramarley's Call" was a cry for justice in a case that has received shrinking news coverage in the four months since it happened.

"He was a good kid. In the time I knew him, he was never in trouble, never hanging out with the wrong crowd," said Brooklyn native David Vaughan, who had tutored Graham.

"We used to always sit in the library and discuss daily life issues and stuff like that," he said. "I always encouraged him to do good in school. I question the NYPD in the sense of their so-called community affairs. They always come out when something happens, but they're never there to relate to the youth before these altercations happen."

For Judith McKenzie, making sense of the tragedy and why Haste, the narcotics officer who shot Graham, is still free was difficult. "This is horrible. Just horrible. I just can't even say it in words--the cop is still working. We need justice. Hopefully, we get justice for Ramarley and his family."