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Herb Boyd inducted into the NABJ Hall of Fame

Cyril Josh Barker | 1/23/2014, 3:22 p.m.
Amsterdam News journalist, author and scholar Herb Boyd was one of eight journalists recently inducted into the National Association of ...
Herb Boyd

Amsterdam News journalist, author and scholar Herb Boyd was one of eight journalists recently inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Hall of Fame. A ceremony was held last Thursday at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Each year, NABJ honors renowned African-American journalists who have made outstanding contributions to the industry. Since 1990, NABJ has inducted 55 distinguished journalists into the Association’s Hall of Fame.

“The board received a stellar group of recommendations. We are privileged to bestow honors on such an elite group of journalists,” said NABJ President Bob Butler.

The NABJ Hall of Fame inductees are named by the board of directors based on recommendations from the Hall of Fame committee, which is chaired by NABJ founder Maureen Bunyan, an evening news anchor with WJLA-TV who was inducted this year as well.

Boyd has authored or edited 22 books, including the recent “Civil Rights: Yesterday & Today.” His book “Baldwin’s Harlem” was a finalist for a 2009 NAACP Image Award. In 1995, with Robert Allen, he received an American Book Award for “Brotherman: The Odyssey of Black Men in America.” “We Shall Overcome,” a media-fusion book with narration by Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee, is used in classrooms around the world, as is his “Autobiography of a People” and “The Harlem Reader.”

“When you receive such a stunning award this late in life, particularly a Hall of Fame induction, there’s a tendency on my part to think that I’ve done all that I can, but I still have some fire in the oven, even if there’s a little snow on the mountain,” Boyd said when he learned he was being inducted.

Boyd was inducted into the NABJ Hall of Fame along with veteran television broadcaster Maureen Bunyan, journalism professor Jay Harris, Moses Newson, retired CNN political anchor Bernard Shaw and the late Zelda Ormes, Ernest Dunbar and Lee Thornton.