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Progressive Alliance Movement host Seminar

Herb Boyd | 7/10/2014, 12:20 p.m.

With Israeli warplanes pounding the Gaza Strip, there is little chance that the strife in Africa will command the headlines in the U.S. As ever, the crisis in the Middle East always trumps the turmoil in Africa, unless there is an American casualty or America’s interest is somehow involved.

In airstrikes Tuesday, Israeli forces killed 12 Palestinians, and while it is obnoxious to minimize any deaths, more than 50 people were killed Sunday in conflicts between Uganda’s security forces and an alleged tribal militia. On Kenya’s coastal district, at least 29 people were killed in two deadly shooting attacks this week. The militant Islamist group al-Shabab of Somali claimed responsibility.

Meanwhile in Nigeria, Boko Haram continues to wreak havoc with kidnappings and attacks on villages, carried out with the intent to eradicate any trace of Christian influence.

This ongoing tragedy may be discussed at the upcoming Economic Community of West African States meeting this week at the summit in Accra, Ghana. However, it may be enough for the delegates to deal with the current outbreak of ebola in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

If the national U.S. media neglects these issues, they can’t be ignored by our local activists, civic leaders, journalists and commentators, who possess insight and compassion on African affairs. A meaningful step in that direction will occur Saturday, July 11 at Riverside Church from noon to 4 p.m.

The seminar—which is the inaugural ceremony for the Progressive Alliance Movement—is chaired by Kwame Fosu and will include such notables as Mayor Bill de Blasio, Rep. Charles Rangel, Dr. Kofi Boateng and Catherine Cudjoe.

“Our health system is broken, and Ghanaians are dying at a frightening rate,” said Fosu, noting one element of the pressing conditions in his native country. The Progressive Alliance Movement is the brainchild of three professionals in New York who are determined to highlight the pertinent and critical issues in Ghana, both at home and abroad.

Said Fosu, “We have observed with disappointment year after year the succession of governments that have come into power with numerous promises but are unable to effect any meaningful change, as the culture of corruption becomes more and more entrenched.”

In a press release, the group spelled out some of its objectives, with citizenship, investment, the elimination of hunger and the processing of raw materials among the top agenda items.

The inaugural ceremony is free and open to the public.