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De Blasio poll numbers show uphill battle

Stephon Johnson | 8/13/2015, 11:06 a.m.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio might have his hands full if he wants to win a second term.
(Bill Moore Photo)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio might have his hands full if he wants to win a second term.

In a Quinnipiac University poll released last week, New York City voters gave New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo an approval rating of 58 percent and New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer an approval rating of 54 percent. As for de Blasio, his rating is split, with 44 percent approving and 44 percent disapproving. That’s the mayor’s worst approval rating since he took office.

De Blasio has found himself at odds with just about everyone since he took office as the anti-Michael Bloomberg. Whether it was the snow plow issue on the Upper East Side, horse carriages, charter schools or Uber, many of de Blasio’s public battles have left him looking less than mayor-like. But does the perception match the reality?

When it comes to issues of race, 64 percent of Black voters approve of the job de Blasio is doing, with 58 percent saying that he’s deserving of reelection. As for white voters, 59 percent disapprove of de Blasio’s job, with 61 percent saying he doesn’t deserve reelection. Hispanic voters approve of de Blasio at a 48 to 38 percent rate, with 49 percent backing a reelection.

When asked if de Blasio understands their problems, 47 percent of voters polled said he did, but 53 percent said Cuomo understood the needs and problems of New Yorkers. “The election calendar keeps getting shorter,” said Quinnipiac University Poll Assistant Director Maurice Carroll in a statement. “So even though it’s two years away, Mayor Bill de Blasio has to be concerned that his reelection numbers are narrowly negative.”

But de Blasio has done right by the unions and that could assist him in a reelection bid. The mayor recently announced a tentative contract agreement with the Uniformed Firefighters Association, which marked the 11th uniformed union to reach a contract agreement with the city and marked 83 percent of the union workforce now under contract agreement.

Despite the public kerfuffles, the unions might be able to keep de Blasio in City Hall.