What you should know about rent regulation laws

AmNews Staff Reports | 6/15/2015, 10:47 p.m.
If you are one of the more than two million New Yorkers who lives in rent-regulated housing, the Department of ...

As the deadline to extend rent regulations passes with no agreement, millions of tenants living in rent-regulated apartments are left with questions about what's going to happen next.

In a statement released Monday night, Gov. Andrew Cuomo tried to bring calm to tenants and sent a message to landlords.

“At this point, both houses of the State Legislature have been unable to come to an agreement to pass new rent regulations,” he said. “While today may be the legal expiration date for some of these laws, landlords should under no circumstances believe that their responsibility under the current rent stabilization program has expired.”

If you are one of the more than two million New Yorkers who lives in rent-regulated housing, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) is informing tenants of their rights. Here's what you need to know:

  • Do not move out. Your landlord cannot put you out of your apartment without going to court. Call the police if your landlord tries to force you out. Your lease is still in effect and remains in effect through the term of the lease.
  • There are still laws on the books protecting you from harassment, and the City is enforcing those laws.
  • Call 311 if you have any concerns or questions about your apartment.
  • If your landlord is harassing you, withholding services, or trying to exploit any lapse in the rent regulation laws to get you to leave your apartment, you should call 311 immediately.

If you are a landlord:

  • Call 311 for questions about what information you should be sharing with your tenants.
  • Tenant harassment laws are still in effect. Any lapse in the rent regulation laws is not an excuse to withhold heat, hot water, or other services -- the City will enforce the housing code.

For more information on tenants' rights (in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Russian, Haitian Creole, and Arabic) or please visit on.nyc.gov/tenants-rights