Quantcast

Sisters Building Sisters to hold anti-domestic violence rally in East New York

OLAYEMI ODESANYA | 10/1/2015, 12:57 p.m.
To highlight this horrible reality, Saturday, Oct. 3 at noon, Sisters Building Sisters in Brooklyn will be spearheading our second ...

Special to the AmNews

It is an awful part of society that domestic violence is still so common. Reports say that many of the city shelters are filled with women and their children trying to escape violent situations at home. There are so many stories of women—and men too—who suffer abuse and violence in their homes, and many do so without ever telling any one.

So, to highlight this horrible reality, Saturday, Oct. 3 at noon, Sisters Building Sisters in Brooklyn will be spearheading our second annual Walk to End Domestic Violence in East New York and Abroad. Sisters Building Sisters is an up-and-coming nonprofit organization providing empowerment opportunities to women and girls in underserved communities.

Rosalyn McIntosh, one of the dedicated co-founders of the group, stated, “In recognition of October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we are coming together as a community, with one voice, to echo throughout our community that domestic violence and violence of any kind is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. One in every 4 women and 1 in every 7 men have experienced some form of domestic violence; yet most cases are never reported. As such, we must stand together in speaking out against this grave issue.”

The walk begins at noon at the intersection of Snediker and Riverdale avenues in Brooklyn, and organizers are calling on “all New Yorkers, nonprofit organizations, elected officials (in and out of our district), tenant associates, block associates, schools, clergy persons, radio stations and community boards.”

McIntosh told the AmNews that Sisters Building Sisters is asking people to “unite with us as we speak out against this global monster called domestic violence because while the physical scars of domestic violence may fade quickly, the emotional scars, that the natural eye cannot detect, often last for decades.”

For more information, call 718-427-6632.