Reparations & facts ignored

DR. WAYNE PERRYMAN | 8/1/2019, 1:40 p.m.
When the discussions of reparations for African-Americans is being debated, Congress and opponents limit their considerations to what happened to ...

When the discussions of reparations for African-Americans is being debated, Congress and opponents limit their considerations to what happened to African-Americans during the horrific period of slavery. Yes, there were millions of Blacks who worked on plantations in America and according to historians, millions more died in the Middle Passage, en route to America. Slavery merely set the foundation for the mistreatment of African-Americans for the next 400 years, mistreatment that continues to this day. To fully understand the justification of reparations for African-Americans, the following should be taken under consideration.

Blacks were allies but never enemies

When you take under consideration that African-Americans fought and died in every war from the Revolutionary War to the current conflicts in the Middle East on behalf of America, while consistently being denied the same rights as their white counterparts, one can argue that this fact alone should justify reparations.

African-Americans fought and died in America’s conflicts against Native Americans, but when the wars were over, Native Americans received 49,933 square miles or 1.3 percent of America’s land. African-Americans who were allies, not enemies, received nothing for their service and remained as slaves.

African-Americans fought and died in the Revolutionary War. When the war was over, while whites were rewarded with their “independence” the institution of slavery which had denied Blacks their “independence” for the past 157 years (from 1619-1776) continued.

African-Americans fought and died in the War of 1812, when the war was over, there was no recognition or appreciation for their service and the institution of slavery for their people continued.

African-Americans fought and died in the Civil War, when the war was over, Jim Crow laws and Black Codes were immediately established to deny them their rights. The era of terror began and many soldiers returning home were lynched and killed to “keep them in their place.” President Lincoln claimed that without the 180,000 Black soldiers, the North never would have won the war and the name United States of America would no longer exist.

African-Americans fought and died in World War I, when the war was over they came home to a nation infested with racism and segregation. After fighting in a segregated military they returned home to segregated schools, churches, neighborhoods, restrooms, water fountains, and even Coca Cola manufactured Coke machines had labels which said they were for “whites only.” These practices which were judicially and legislatively sanctioned and were designed to deny African-Americans their constitutional rights. Blacks were ordered to sit on the back of the bus and keep their mouths shut.

African-Americans fought and died in World War II. When the war was over they returned home to rat-infested ghetto neighborhoods and later learned that America was giving the enemy who bombed Pearl Harbor (Japan) $2.2 billion to rebuild their country and Europe $12 billion to rebuild their war-torn cities under the Marshall Plan. African-Americans did not receive one dime to rebuild their communities. In fact the money paid to Western European countries and to Japan included money Black employees paid in taxes. American Japanese received reparations for their internment and Blacks received retributions.