Ballet Hispánico announces IG video series in response to pandemic

LAPACAZO SANDOVAL | 3/26/2020, midnight
Ladies and gentlemen, let the dance begin.
Ballet Hispanico

Ladies and gentlemen, let the dance begin. Wait—I understand that the world is living in a pandemic panic of sorts. We are growing concerned about how our world is running and questioning who’s running it.

Do we need an outlet? Do we need entertainment? I’m saying yes, and the management behind Ballet Hispánico agrees. They agree that the world should dance, and to that end, they announced a new Instagram video series entitled “B Unidos” which began Monday, March 23 at 12 noon.

The “B Unidos” series will feature a series of videos posted each weekday, created by the three arms of the Ballet Hispánico: the professional company, the School of Dance, and Community Arts Partnership (CAP) and featuring the hashtag #BUnidos at www.instagram.com/ballethispanico/.

Ballet Hispánico, America’s leading Latino dance organization, has been bringing people together to celebrate the joy and diversity of Latino cultures for 50 years.

Eduardo Vilaro, artistic director and CEO of Ballet Hispánico, understands the need for creative expression. Here’s what he said about “B Unidos.”

“As a community of dancers, artists, and human beings, we are all in this together. We will persevere through this challenging time and we hope that these videos provide a coping outlet, for you, for our followers and the community overall. Now more than ever, it is important to band together in support of the arts. The personal and professional challenges that we have already endured and will continue to face over the next few weeks or months are significant. What we can take from this time of cancellations, uncertainty, and social distancing is a chance to use our creativity to connect with the community on a new level. Social distancing does not mean emotional distancing. Ballet Hispánico was founded upon and has always believed in the importance of reaching and servicing our community through dance and culture. As this pandemic occurs during our 50th anniversary, it provides us with an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, get back to our roots by reaching out to community near and far, and look forward to what is ahead.”

Going forward, each weekday at 3 p.m., the company will release a new video generated by the dancers, teachers, and administrators to serve as a class, exercise, and inspiration: Motivational Mondays (inspirational messages), Take Action Tuesdays (technique tips for young dancers), Wepa Wednesdays (explorations of the many varied styles of Latin dance), Therapeutic Thursdays (focus on conditioning, health, wellness, stretching), and Flashback Fridays (retrospective looks at the past 50 years from Ballet Hispánico’s archives).

Over the past five decades, Ballet Hispánico’s mission-driven ethos has been a catalyst of change for communities throughout our nation. By bringing the richness of the Latinx culture to the forefront of performance, education and social advocacy, Ballet Hispánico is a cultural ambassador.

The organization’s founder, National Medal of Arts recipient Tina Ramirez, sought to give voice to the Hispanic experience and break through stereotypes. Today, Ballet Hispánico is led by Vilaro, an acclaimed choreographer and former member of the Company whose artistic vision responds to the need for social equity, cultural identity, and quality arts education for all.