Dr. Gerald Deas

For great health tips and access to an online community of physicians and other health care professionals, visit DrDeas.com.



Recent Stories

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Be more vocal about asthma

Dr. Deas discusses the dangers of asthma.

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Berries are berry good for you

If the great baseball player Darryl Strawberry would have eaten more strawberries, he may have prevented the development of colon cancer.

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NYC Health + Hospitals honors disabilities advocate Marilyn E. Saviola

NYC Health + Hospitals’ Vice President of Ambulatory Care, Dr. Ted Long, last week honored Marilyn E. Saviola, the founder of the Independence Care System Women’s Health Program and nationally recognized disability-rights advocate, for her unwavering advocacy for the rights of people with physical disabilities to live at home and in the community as independently as possible.

Grapefruit juice and magnesium for high blood pressure

Years ago, I can recall my mom and her friends talking about taking Epsom salts and grapefruit juice to lower blood pressure.

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Mine and mind your own body

I am sure that you have been reading in magazines, newspapers and etc., how physicians are finally trying to incorporate the mind of a patient in the healing process.

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Food for thought—and lung health

Taking up most of the space in our chests are two beautiful organs called the lungs. Yes, they breathe, providing our bodies with the needed oxygen to keep the other organs—such as the heart, kidneys, brain, etc.—alive.

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Life is a matter of fact

Anything that exists on this planet is made up of atoms and is a form of matter. For example, H2O (water) is made up of two atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen.

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Garlic: The breath of life

I am familiar with one herb in the plant kingdom that has kept people healthy through the centuries.

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Worries end with berries

In life, we all will have worries that are oftentimes not under our control.

A fight with sulfites

Mrs. C, 34, works as a clerk in a duplicating shop. When she consulted me about night wheezing and shortness of breath, the first question I asked was whether she had experienced the wheezing and chronic coughing at work. It is known that fumes from copy machines can cause such allergic reactions, as well as throat irritation.

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