Quantcast

Back to profile

Herb Boyd

Stories by Herb

Tease photo

Author and dedicated missionary Victoria Earle Matthews

There was a time when 136th Street in Harlem was bustling with social and political activity; now the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce and the New York Urban League remain.

Tease photo

Get on the Justice Caravan

Saturday, Aug. 23, civil-and human-rights activists will assemble on the other side of the Verrazano Narrow-Bridge, not the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River, as marchers did in 1965

Tease photo

Unrest continues in Ferguson in the wake of Michael Brown police shooting

Attorney General Eric Holder arrived Wednesday afternoon in Ferguson, Mo., where he met with the city’s leaders, FBI officials and local law enforcement officers and briefly stated what he’d already written earlier in an op-ed in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Tease photo

Brown family: 'He was executed'

An independent autopsy reveals Michael Brown was shot six times by police officer Darren Wilson with a fatal shot to the head.

Tease photo

Hillary hits Obama

President Barack Obama has apparently withstood a proposed GOP lawsuit, but now there’s a problem much closer to home, a critic in his own ranks—Hillary Clinton.

Tease photo

The Funk Brothers, Motown stalwarts

“Get on Up,” the new James Brown biopic, is a film of incessant funk. On Broadway, there is more funk, if a bit more subdued, in “Motown the Musical.”

Tourism and awards at NYC Economic Development Day

As ever, the luncheon was the centerpiece at the New York City Economic Development Day at Columbia University last Thursday.

Tease photo

Ebola—a threat to humanity

The daily death count from Ebola only seems to gain media attention in the West when an American or European is the fatality.

Tease photo

James Baldwin gets his place in Harlem

As the old saying goes, the fruit never falls that far from the tree, and Trevor Baldwin, the nephew of James Baldwin, proves that even a relative of the great writer has a way with words. “This is a family affair,” he announced toward the end of a street renaming for his famous uncle.

Tease photo

Barbara Jordan: An American hero

Recently, on a CSPAN telecast of the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment hearings on President Richard Nixon in 1974, it was Rep. Barbara Jordan’s turn at the microphone.

Tease photo

Eric Garner case highlights schism between cops and community

Each day brings new developments in the death of Eric Garner. Last Friday, the city’s medical examiner announced that Garner’s death resulted from a chokehold, something that was evident from the cellphone video of the encounter.

Obama and Abraham

Of all President Barack Obama’s troubling international issues, his biggest headache and dilemma is the conflict in the Middle East, more specifically, the on-again, off-again exchange of death and misery between Israel and Hamas.

Tease photo

Happy birthday, Mr. President

Aug. 4, President Barack Obama turned 53. He was 13 years old in 1974, when President Richard Nixon, facing impeachment, resigned from office. Forty years later, impeachment is again a word making the rounds, mainly from Republicans who accuse Obama of a number of misdeeds, none of them approaching treason or high crimes and misdemeanors—the only grounds on which he could be impeached.

Tease photo

More ‘Power’ to Africa from Obama

With invitations extended to some 50 African leaders for the recent summit in Washington, D.C., President Barack Obama has taken an even more decisive step in the expansion of his previously proposed Power Africa.

Tease photo

Broken promises

Each day brings new developments in the death of Eric Garner. Last Friday, the city’s medical examiner announced that Garner’s death resulted from a chokehold, something that was evident from the cell phone video of the encounter.

Tease photo

James Baldwin gets his 'Place' in Harlem

Except for James Baldwin, very few of our legendary writers were actually born in Harlem. But next Saturday, Aug. 2, that point will be made definitively when a section of West 128th Street, between Madison and Fifth avenues, will be named “James Baldwin Place.” 

Tease photo

James Boggs: A visionary revolutionary

There have been countless African-American thinkers and activists—men and women—unassociated with academic institutions, yet who have nonetheless made considerable scholarly contributions.

Tease photo

Full arsenal of funk from James Carter at Lowdown Hudson Blues Festival

Although James Carter played the soprano, alto and tenor saxophones in succession during his sizzling performance as the opening act at the Lowdown Hudson Blues Festival Thursday evening at the Waterfront Plaza in the Financial District, there were times when he seemed to be playing all three at once, sounding like a rip-snorting version of the World Saxophone Quartet or Rahsaan Roland Kirk.

Tease photo

Alice Coachman, an immortal Olympian

Amsterdam News in the Classroom

It isn’t often that this column is devoted to either the living or the recently departed, but it would be absolutely criminal not to suspend the usual guidelines and give the space to a woman who holds a unique place in African-American history, Alice Coachman.

Tease photo

Community in Outrage over handling of Eric Garner police killing

When a white police officer kills an unarmed Black man, as it happened last week on Staten Island, you can expect a furious outrage from one part of the community and an attempt to justify the death from the other side.

Tease photo

Black man choked to death by cops

With images of Marlene Pinnock, a black woman brutally beaten by a California Patrol office on July 1 still fresh on the nation’s mind, another more fatal scene was captured on video yesterday from Staten Island.

No eyes on Gaza

While millions of eyes were glued to the World Cup final in Brazil, few turned away from the game to see the ongoing exchange of bombs falling on Israel and Gaza.

‘Racial animus’ from Republicans, AG Holder charges

Attorney General Eric Holder is apparently no longer willing to hold his tongue and is clearly fed up with outlandish charges and accusations from Republicans.

Obama welcomes new citizens

Each day brings a new obstacle to surmount, and on the Fourth of July, immigration reform—or the failure thereof—had to be numero uno for Obama as he welcomed a new batch of American citizens.

Progressive Alliance Movement host Seminar

With Israeli warplanes pounding the Gaza Strip, there is little chance that the strife in Africa will command the headlines in the U.S. As ever, the crisis in the Middle East always trumps the turmoil in Africa, unless there is an American casualty or America’s interest is somehow involved.

Tease photo

Prolific and passionate author Walter Dean Myers dies at 76

Walter Dean Myers was as prolific as he was passionate about children’s literature.

Tease photo

The Brown men and Paul Robeson

Lawrence Brown and Lloyd Brown teach us about the music and writing of Paul Robeson

Lawrence and Lloyd Brown were not related by blood as far as we know, but they had one thing in common: their kinship to the great Paul Robeson. Given his enormous genius, Robeson realized his deficiencies, which was another part of his genius, and sought the assistance of the Browns. From a musical perspective, it was Lawrence; when it came to getting his words into print, it was Lloyd.

Tease photo

Singer and dancer Florence Mills was the ‘Queen of Happiness’

AmNews in the Classroom

A few weeks ago while doing a profile on the great pianist and composer Eubie Blake, I was reacquainted with the short but brilliant life of Florence Mills, who starred in Blake and Noble Sissle’s musical “Shuffle Along” in 1921.

Tease photo

Harlem and Detroit: Same difference

Researching the history of the Black community in Detroit, my hometown, I am struck by the number of commonalities it shares with New York City, particularly Harlem, where I have lived for nearly a generation.

‘You are valuable, Black men,’ preaches Michael Eric Dyson

“Are you the one or should we expect someone else?” Dr. Michael Eric Dyson asked rhetorically, addressing an audience last Thursday evening at Bethel AME Church.

Obama once more between Iraq and a hard place

Just when we thought it couldn’t get any worse for the Obama administration, it did.

Tease photo

Resourceful, gifted Dr. Charles H. Wright

School kids in Detroit in the mid-1960s used to look forward to field trips that included a visit to the Museum of African American History, where they could view such items as the first traffic signal and gas mask invented by Garrett Morgan. If they were lucky, they might also see Dr. Charles H. Wright, who founded the museum.

Tease photo

First lady of African-American stage and screen, Ruby Dee, dies at 91

Ruby Dee, the first lady of African-American theater and film, made her transition last Wednesday, June 11, at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y., according to Arminda Thomas, the archivist for Dee-Davis Enterprises. Dee was 91 and the cause of death was not disclosed.

Tease photo

The supremely versatile Althea Gibson

If there is a marker on 143rd Street near Malcolm X Boulevard for tennis great Althea Gibson, it is not clearly visible. And if there is one for her embedded on the Walk of Fame on 135th Street, it’s perhaps obscured by debris. Ironically, it was in the streets of Harlem that she first gained public recognition.

Tease photo

Basil Paterson’s remarkable life celebrated at Riverside Church

Basil A. Paterson’s prowess in the kitchen, especially his special way of making blueberry pancakes, was mentioned with reverence by several speakers at his memorial service last Thursday evening at the Riverside Church. However, his ability on the grill took second place to the citations and commendations about his expertise in the legal arena and in the political realm.

Tease photo

The wizard of housing: Robert C. Weaver

When your maternal grandfather is the first African-American to graduate from Harvard University’s School of Dentistry, then your middle-class status is firmly established and your educational pedigree is a mark of distinction.

Reparations redux

As thousands of college students return home for the summer and compete with the thousands of teenagers already scrambling for jobs in an ever-shrinking job market, the Obama administration has announced it will be allotting $6.7 million for the creation of conservation jobs for youths and returning veterans.

William Worthy Jr., a bold Black journalist dead at 92

At a time when journalists were forbidden to travel to China, Cuba and the Soviet Union, William Worthy Jr. defied the U.S. State Department, grabbed his trusty typewriter and embarked on journeys to report the unreportable, interviewing several prominent Communist leaders.

Tease photo

Claudia Jones was to the left of Karl Marx

There’s very little to distinguish 504 143rd St. between Hamilton Place and Broadway. But there was a time back in the late 1940s when a notable revolutionary lived here.

NAACP selects Brooks as new leader

Last week, the NAACP’s national board of directors selected attorney Cornell William Brooks to be the association’s president and CEO. Since Benjamin Todd Jealous stepped down, an interim president was installed. Brooks, a veteran lawyer, minister and longtime president and CEO of the Newark-based New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, will now be in charge of the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization.

Tease photo

Beloved revolutionary Elombe Brath joins the ancestors

On the very day his friends and comrades were celebrating the birthday of Malcolm X (El Hajj Malik El Shabazz), Elombe Brath was joining his fellow revolutionary on the other side of our struggle. Brath, 77, made his transition on Monday, May 19 at the Amsterdam Nursing Home, according to his son, Cinque.

Tease photo

Oliver Brown was more than a footnote in history

Sixty years ago this week, in 1954, the nation witnessed the Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education that supposedly brought an end to segregated schools.

Tease photo

Three gallant freedom fighters join the ancestors

I was still reeling from the news that one of Detroit’s most remarkable freedom fighters, General Gordon Baker Jr., had joined the ancestors when in rapid succession, like a machine gun of sorrow, word came that the author Sam Greenlee had expired and that the uncompromising voice of Vincent Harding was stilled. Then, as if there was no end to the sadness, the phone was alive with messages that the beloved Elombe Brath was no longer a breathing icon of commitment

Big day at the NBT

“Ready for revolution” was the battle cry for Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), and it was also a mantra by which the activist lived during his spirited stay among us

Tease photo

Memorial services for Basil A. Paterson May 29 at Riverside

A memorial service for the esteemed attorney and civil servant Basil Alexander Paterson is scheduled for Thursday, May 29 at Riverside Baptist Church from 6 to 8 p.m.

Tease photo

Educator supreme Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune

There are so many exciting and innovative ways to invoke our immortal ancestors, and the Central Brooklyn Leadership Council and the Men’s Ministry of Historic First Church of God in Christ in Brooklyn did it wonderfully in a pre-Mother’s Day event by saluting four women with its second annual Mary McLeod Bethune: Light of Our Life Awards.

Tease photo

Celebrating the well-lived life of Paul Robeson Jr.

Appropriately, the sonorous voice of Paul Robeson singing a “Balm in Gilead” opened the celebration of the life of his son, the younger Paul Robeson

Tease photo

The intrepid George Washington Williams

Recently, there have been a number of books about the Congo.

Obama tour to forge ties in Southeast Asia

Not since 1998 has a top American official paid a visit to Malaysia and President Barack Obama may have some second thoughts about his current tour of the nation

Tease photo

Paul Robeson Jr, the son of a legend who made his own mark, dead at 86

Paul Robeson Jr. 86, died last Saturday, April 26, in Jersey City, N.J.

Prev