Young children living in New York City await the warm weather and fun of the summer. However, parents may be more worried about keeping their youngsters busy during the long months out of school. This summer, children can learn new skills, play and make friends at summer camps that won’t break their parent’s bank accounts.

“It is imperative for parents to have their children enrolled in camps. One main reason is that it keeps them occupied, which will hopefully keep them out of trouble,” said Patrice Casimir, 28, of Queens. “Boredom for children and young adults is never a good thing.”

All five boroughs offer camps, and kids as young as 3 years old can attend some of them. Below is a list of camps that are either inexpensive, offer assistance for families who struggle financially or are free. Remember, sign-up dates are crucial if families wish to qualify for financial assistance.

The Brown family, residents of Manhattan, are sending their children to the Asase Yaa Children’s Arts Camp, where kids learn more about African-American culture and history through arts and crafts and other performances.

CAMPS FOR CHILDREN

The Asase Yaa Children’s Arts Camp. Located at P.S. 335 in the middle of the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Crown Heights neighborhoods in Brooklyn. The camp runs for six weeks at the cost of $600 and an early registration fee of $35. The camp begins Monday, July 9. Application deadlines are approaching. Visit http://asaseyaaent.com/html/about.php?psi=28.

Oasis Day Camp. Located in Central Park. Spots are open for all of the different age groups. Save 50 percent on weeks 7 and 8. Contact info@oasischildren.com or call (718) 596-4900.

JCC in Manhattan. Spots are still open for 4- and 5-year-olds. Session C is July 20-Aug. 14. Contact Genna Singer by calling (646) 505-4430 or emailing gsinger@jccnyc.org.

CAMPS FOR TEENAGERS

Teenagers can also participate in programs throughout the city that develop a young adult’s character and skills. Whether it is camps meant to prepare teenagers for the next step in their lives or just enjoying the company of others, there are many options to choose from.

To further keep kids out of trouble and on a path to success, the Teens Project offers teens this summer a place to stay and escape daily troubles that affect them in harmful ways. The founder, Lauri Burns, hopes to transform New York City by helping teens get back on track.

Prospect Park YMCA. Day camp that is offered to kids up to the age of 16. Located in Brooklyn. There are spots open and kids can begin at any time. Visit www.ymcanyc.org/prospectpark.

Urban Adventure Camp in Chelsea. There are spots open for kids from the ages of 12-16. The camp will include kayaking, rock climbing and sailing, with weekly excursions into the city. Visit www.chelseapiers.com/acrodocs/camp/2012/Urban_12.pdf.

INTERNSHIPS

National Association of Black Journalists Internship Program: Experience life in the media among Black professionals. Applicants must be a member in order to fill out the forms, which can be found at www.nabj.org by clicking on the tab that says “Students.”

African American Environmentalist Association. This internship is a great way to learn about global warming and how to prevent it, as well as environmental campaigning. Interns can apply at any time. For more information, visit aaenviornmental.blogspot.com.

Summer employment jobs, day programs, and community programs are still available for teenagers who live in New York City. Whatever sparks your interest can be found by visiting www.nyc.gov/html/dycd/html/home/home.shtml.