Harlem Hospital

Did you know?

The iconic mural on Harlem Hospital’s exterior is an excerpt from the first-ever federally funded art project by a black artist.

Wait, what?

In 1937, Vertis Hayes’ created the “Pursuit of Happiness” mural as part of the the U.S. government’s Works Progress Administration program. In 2012, Harlem Hospital erected a large scale portion of the mural as the facade of it’s Mural Pavilion.


Abyssinian Baptist Church

Did you know?

In the 1930s, Abyssinian reportedly had the largest Protestant congregation in the United States. Over 10,000 people were members.

Wait, what?

The Abyssinian congregation was started when Ethiopian immigrants were upset at racial segregation in U.S. baptist churches in the 19th century. It’s notoriety grew and it became one of the largest baptist organizations in the world.


Harlem Renaissance Casino and Ballroom

Did you know?

Harlem Renaissance Casino and Ballroom was home court to the first ever professional championship winning basketball team, The New York Renaissance, also known as “the Renns.”

Wait, what?

The very popular former nightlife spot and events center hosted basketball games followed by dances. The Renaissance’s parties were frequented by New York City and Harlem elite.


Harlem YMCA

Did you know?

Malcolm X, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes all called the Harlem Y ‘home’ at one point?

Wait, what?

Numerous now-famous names stayed, worked, or performed at this historic location. Others include Jackie Robinson and Sydney Portier.


Hotel Theresa

Did you know?

In 1960, Fidel Castro stayed at the Hotel Theresa after allegedly being kicked out of his midtown hotel.

Wait, what?

During a UN meeting, Castro and many of his officials took up residence at Hotel Theresa. The likes of Malcolm X and Langston Hughes met with him there.


The Apollo Theater

Did you know?

Before becoming what is now known as The Apollo, the infamous venue served as a white burlesque theater.

Wait, what?

Hurtig & Seamon’s New Burlesque Theater was built in 1913 and fell upon hard times during the economic collapse of the late 1920s. The property was purchased Sidney Cohen and transformed into The Apollo in the early 1930s.


The facts in this article were gleaned from Free Tours By Foot’s Harlem Tour. Shout out to tour guide Derrick Edwards. Thanks!

YMCA photo by Jim.henderson.