March is sure to come in like a lion, although I don’t know if it will go out like a lamb. I find the best way to stay warm in frigid weather is to think warm thoughts, such as lying on the beach in Luquillo, Puerto Rico; drinking hot cocoa with tiny marshmallows; sitting at an outdoor cafe sipping on something cool on a hot steamy day; or wearing a mink coat. Are you warm yet?

Before the gala, there’s often a mini-gala of sorts to discuss the details of the upcoming gala. One such event took place most recently at the home of Katherine and Sam Weinhoff, supporters of the Randall’s Island Park Alliance. The Alliance hosts the annual 2015 Fielding Dreams Gala, and this year’s honorees will be New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz and the executive vice president and general counsel for McGraw Hill Financial, Lucy Fato. Guests, including Manhattan Borough President Gail Brewer, New York City Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver, Courtney Hall, Joseph Garba and Donald Douglas, enjoyed cocktails and hors d’euvres while discussing plans for the upcoming gala, and that’s always fun.

The gala, which will benefit Randall’s Island Park, will be held at the American Museum of Natural History Tuesday, March 10. We all know how important the preservation of Randall’s Island is because it is the city’s ultimate center for athletic, cultural and environmental activities for all New Yorkers. You might want to be there, but I can’t promise ticket prices will be within the budget.

Also planning ahead with a party before the party was fashion designer b Michael, who participated in the Youth America Grand Prix panel discussion entitled, “The Making of a Costume.” The Youth America Grand Prix supports and develops children ages 9 to 19 of all ethnic, economic and geographic backgrounds into world-class dancers by providing scholarship auditions, educational programs and, most importantly, performance opportunities.

The organization also serves as the global network of dance, connecting students, teachers, schools, dancers, dance companies and audiences. The event took place in a rehearsal studio at New York City Center, where principal dancer Chase Finlay and Youth America Grand Prix alumna and soloist Lauren Lovette, both from the New York City Ballet, participated in “The Making of a Costume” panel and performed an original pas de deux.

The highlight of the evening had to be when b Michael presented a one-of-a-kind tutu, modeled by Corps de Ballet dancer at American Ballet Theatre and YAGP alumna Catherine Hurlin. The tutu was then auctioned off by board member Richard Osterweil. Michael Weil, who won the auction, generously donated the tutu to Hurlin. Isn’t it nice when what goes around, comes around in a good way? Another highlight was Shirley Madhere, who dazzled in a gold lamé dress, with a black bolero vest and fur short sleeves. Irene Shen dazzled in royal blue.

The “Stars of Today Meet the Stars of Tomorrow” gala will take place at the David H. Koch Theater in New York City, April 16. Featured will be performances by leading dancers from the most prominent companies. For more information about the ticketed gala dinner, contact Erin Arbuckle, development manager at 646-791-9500 or earbuckle@yagp.org.

We can’t possibly mention ballet without mentioning the Dance Theatre of Harlem, the ultimate in ballet theater, which just happens to be performed by some of the world’s most gifted Black dancers. Their 2015 New York dance performance runs April 8 through April 11 at City Center. Perennial favorites such as Robert Garland’s “Return” (set to the music of James Brown and Aretha Franklin) and Ulysses Dove’s haunting “Dancing on the Front Porch of Heaven” mix, with three works new to the company, will be performed. Also part of the program are the New York premiere of “Vessels” by Darrell Grand Moultrie, the delightful and popular “Tschaikovsky Pas De Deux” by George Balanchine and a company premiere of Nacho Duato’s “Coming Together.”

World-renowned photographer Russell James unveiled his art collection“Seminole Spirit,” a reflection of the culture, community and history of the Seminole tribe of Florida. The 30-piece collection, presented by Nomad Two Worlds, featuring supermodel Behati Prinsloo, is being shown at the Stephan Weiss Studio in New York City. If you want to see the “positive ‘spirit’ of the Seminole tribe through the artistic vision of Russell James,” then you’d better hurry, as spring is coming and, like winter, the exhibit will soon be gone.

Want to know what is noted to be the hardest working charitable organization in town? It’s the Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. They ask a lot of the volunteers and the team delivers. Supporting cancer research and providing public education on the early prevention, detection and treatment of cancer is serious business. So what better way to give thanks than to give a luncheon? So what if the luncheon was also a fundraiser? If it’s not for one good cause, it’s for another.

We have our own delicious Sette Panni uptown, but others across 110th Street have Sette Mezzo downtown. Seen eating there most recently was Chris Rock. No, he wasn’t telling jokes. He was eating. Although Sette Mezzo does takeout, you have to provide your own method of picking up your order because they don’t deliver. They don’t take credit cards either. The draw at Sette Mezzo is good Italian food and a menu that changes daily. Yeah, but do they make a good meatball?

Happy birthday to Joe Boisvert, Ludwig Gaines and Ellis Cose. I would say happy birthday to Calvin Bass, but seeing how he’s a leap year baby, born Feb. 29, we’ll just have to wait until leap year.

Larry Love Caldwell gave his trial sermon at the Christian Parish for Spiritual Renewal at 122nd Street and Seventh Avenue before a congregation of friends and family. The sermon was followed by a candlelight march from the church down to Canaan Baptist Church at 116th Street in remembrance of all of the dearly departed souls. Supper was held at the church, where good food and good fellowship was enjoyed by all.

Until next week … kisses.