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A new Gallup study reveals that Black graduates of historically Black colleges and universities are more likely than Black graduates of other institutions to be thriving in a number of areas of their lives, particularly in their financial and well-being.

The report comes as the conversation continues about the purpose and mission of HBUCs in America, with so many options for Blacks in higher education.

More than 55,000 college graduates aged 18 and older with Internet access, who received bachelor’s degrees between 1940 and 2015, were polled by the Gallup-Purdue Index between 2014 and 2015. The study included 520 Black graduates of HBCUs and 1,758 Black graduates of other colleges. Decade of graduation, student loan debt and parents’ education were factors in the study.

Of the five elements of well-being that Gallup measures, half of Black graduates of HBCUs are most likely to be thriving in social and purpose well-being. The majority of them reported having strong social relationships and enjoyed what they were doing everyday.

Gallup reports that although similar percentages of Black HBCU graduates and Black non-HBCU graduates are thriving in social well-being, HBCU graduates lead non-HBCU graduates in purpose well-being—fewer than half of non-HBCU graduates (43 percent) are thriving in this area.

The study targeted areas that included financial and purpose well-being. According to the report, Black graduates of HBCUs are more likely than Black graduates of other colleges to strongly agree they had the support and experiential learning opportunities in college. The result was a positive quality of life after college.

Fifty-five percent of Black HBCU graduates were more likely to strongly agree that their colleges prepared them for life after graduation compared with 29 percent of Black graduates of other institutions.

More than 1 in 3 Black HBCU graduates strongly agree that they had a professor who cared about them as a person, a professor who made them excited about learning and a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams. Only 12 percent of Black non-HBCU graduates strongly agree that they had all three experiences.

Approximately 60 percent of Black graduates of HBCUs are more likely to strongly agree they had each of these experiences, compared with nearly 30 percent of non-HBCU Black graduates who said they had a similar experience.

Four in 10 Black HBCU graduates are thriving in the area of financial well-being, compared with fewer than 3 in 10 Black graduates of other schools.