Chicago officer who shot Laquan McDonald charged with murder

By Greg Botelho, Ashley Fantz and Bill Kirkos CNN | 11/24/2015, 11:46 a.m.
The Chicago officer charged in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald is no longer being paid by the police ...
Laquan McDonald (left) and former Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke McDonald Family/Cook County State Attorney

CHICAGO (CNN) -- The Chicago Police Department has released a video showing the shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was killed by an officer in October 2014.

CNN is reviewing the video.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel called for calm ahead of the video's release.

"I believe this is a moment that can build bridges of understanding rather than become a barrier of misunderstanding," he said.

Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy acknowledged citizens "have a right to be angry."

"People have a right to be angry, people have a right to protest, people have a right to free speech, but they do not have a right to commit criminal acts," he said.

The city has been preparing for protests in advance of the video's release.

The Chicago officer charged in McDonald's death is no longer being paid by the police department, McCarthy told reporters.

"The officer in this case took a young man's life and he's going to have to account for his actions," he said.

The Chicago officer charged in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald is no longer being paid by the police department, Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy told reporters Tuesday.

"The officer in this case took a young man's life and he's going to have to account for his actions," he said in announcing the release of the video of the shooting.

The Chicago police officer who fatally shot black teenager Laquan McDonald has been charged with first-degree murder, a major turn that comes as many in the city brace for potential unrest.

Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez announced that the officer, Jason Van Dyke, turned himself in to authorities Tuesday.

"It is my determination that this defendant's actions -- of shooting Laquan McDonald when he did not pose an immediate threat of great bodily harm or death, and his subsequent actions of shooting Laquan McDonald while he lay on the ground after previously being struck by gunfire --- were not justified and they were not a proper use of deadly force by this police officer," she told reporters.

Until Tuesday, Van Dyke still worked for the police department in a "limited duty position" as investigators probed the October 20, 2014, death.

The announcement of charges happened one day before the city's deadline to release video that shows the shooting. Until last week, officials had resisted such a release, fearing it could jeopardize investigations. Others said it could spur major protests in reaction to footage that even Van Dyke's attorney admits is "graphic, disturbing and difficult to watch."

Alvarez said the deadline moved up the timing of her announcement, but did not dictate her decision to charge the officer with first-degree murder. She also defended the time it took her office to investigate by saying the case is complicated.

"Maintaining public safety is my No. 1 job and I do not want the public to view this video without knowing this very important context that with these charges we are bringing a full measure of justice that this demands," she said.