“I tell you, there’s nothing like a low-down political fight to put roses in my cheeks…”–Lee Tracy, “The Best Man” (1964)

As the days dwindle down to Nov. 6, it is clear that Barack Hussein Obama is not a lock to be re-elected president. In fact, if the election were held today, there is a better than even chance that the Republican standard-bearer, Mitt Romney, would win.

Indeed, with just over four months left as this is written, Romney leads in most polls. The most important question is, who can best fix the economy? And the answer is always Romney.

But the main reason is not that Romney is doing so good, it’s that Obama is doing so bad. For a number of months, the president has dropped the ball on one issue after another, and the news media–liberal as well as conservative–has taken note.

A good example was a definitive piece by Herb Boyd in the June 14 Amsterdam News headlined “Bad week for Obama.” His eloquent lead was on point:

“To say last week was a bad one for President Barack Obama is a gross understatement. He was hoisted on his own petard, so to speak, by the comment that ‘the private sector is doing fine’ during a press conference on the nation’s economy on Friday [June 8], then hanged in effigy by Terry Jones, the Quran-burning pastor in Florida.”

Boyd continued: “It was bad enough to receive a monthly report of an increase of only 69,000 jobs in May. Then there was the Democratic setback in Wisconsin, with the recall of Gov. Scott Walker coming up empty. And for the first time on the campaign trail, Romney brought in more money than Obama in the latest reports.

“At the end of his brief press conference, a reporter queried Obama on the national security leaks that Republicans had pounced on, charging that the leaks were done purposely to enhance his re-election bid. Obama quickly dispatched this allegation.”

Boyd’s reporting coincided with letters to the editor across America. To wit:

“Obama’s economic cluelessness was clear in his ‘the private sector is doing fine’ [comment]. It should mark the election turning point, just as his 2008 declaration that ‘when you spread the wealth around, it’s good for everybody’ forewarned his big-government spending.”

“Obama does believe the private sector is doing fine, because he holds it in contempt. He believes that government, not private citizens, should decide who gets what and how much…The media can longer hide that fact.”

“The White House is a building and buildings can’t talk. It is the people in the White House who leaked the information. Our national security is at risk.”

“Who is Obama trying to protect, and why won’t he appoint a special prosecutor? The leaker must be someone extremely close to Obama with access to the Oval Office and the press. If it is Axelrod, it’s hard to believe the campaigner-in-chief didn’t know about it.”

In the event it’s proven that the leaks of highly classified information on national security concerning Iran and Iraq did originate in the White House, then Obama is to blame. Why? Because in his recent statement, he brazenly called it “my White House.”

This explosive issue also involves Obama’s handpicked attorney general, Eric Holder, who has named Ronald Machen–a heavy Obama campaign donor–as one of two special prosecutors to look into the leaks. He also chose Republican Rod Rothstein instead of appointing impartial attorneys to investigate this serious breach of security.

In Senate Judiciary Committee hearings, Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) called for Holder to resign. At this writing, Holder could be held in contempt of Congress over the Justice Department’s notorious “Fast and Furious” gun-walking sting that provided 2,000 weapons to Mexican drug cartels. This resulted in the death of Brian Terry, a Border Patrol officer who was killed along with hundreds of Mexicans by these weapons.

Other losing issues for Obama include a high 8.2 percent unemployment rate; ongoing high gas prices; his embrace of gay marriage; his refusal to approve the Keystone XL pipeline; the strong possibility the Supreme Court will rule Obamacare unconstitutional; holding more than 150 fundraisers–more than the last four presidents combined–many with vacuous celebrities; and his infamous weekly counterterrorism “kill list.”

Then there was Democrat Hilary Rosen’s put-down of Mitt Romney’s wife; James Carville’s comment that Obama “seems incapable of getting that the economy sucks and the private sector isn’t doing fine”; Newark Mayor Cory Booker calling Democrats’ attack on Romney’s former private equity firm, Bain Capital, “nauseating”; ex-U.S. Rep Harold Ford Jr. (D-Tenn.) agreeing with Booker; Bill Clinton saying Romney has “a sterling” business career; and the prostitution scandal involving Secret Service agents.

Obama also is catching flack for his executive order suspending deportation of young illegal aliens and letting others apply for green cards. The policy change allows illegals under 30 who came to America before age 16 to work and study without being sent back. This would cover some 800,000 young people who were brought in illegally as children by parents.

The move is being called blatantly political by many in order for Obama to woo the important Latino voting bloc. This vote may well be in play in November if Romney picks Florida Sen. Marco Rubio as his running mate.

Bottom line: No matter how you cut it, Obama is in trouble. Thus, the possible “one-term proposition” he himself mentioned, looms large. And that’s the name of that tune.