A staggering 90 percent of people fail to achieve a good night’s sleep, according to new international research presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2022.

The study found that suboptimal sleep was associated with a higher likelihood of heart disease and stroke.

The authors estimated that seven in ten of these cardiovascular conditions could be prevented if everyone was a good sleeper.

And while researchers homed in on the sleep behaviors of 7,200 people comprised mostly of Europeans, Americans also aren’t sleeping.

Black Americans suffer worse from short sleep or sleep apnea.

Earlier this year, the JAMA Open Network indicated that the problem continues to worsen for African Americans.

JAMA researchers discovered that Black Americans get less sleep than white people, a deficit of 15 minutes a day in childhood that grows into almost an hour in adulthood.

Additionally, an Oxford study found that far more Black and Hispanic people than white people report routinely getting less than 6 hours of sleep, well short of the recommended 7 to 9 hours for adults.

“Sleep is a privilege,” Dayna Johnson, a sleep epidemiologist at Emory University, told Science.org. “If we can target sleep, we might be able to reduce the burden of all types of diseases among racial minorities.”

Science Direct found that more than a dozen studies have identified racial discrimination as a contributor to sleep disparities.

“Black people reported more discrimination and more severe insomnia symptoms than white people, and a statistical analysis determined discrimination accounted for 60% of their insomnia severity,” researchers wrote at Science Direct.

A staggering 90 percent of people fail to achieve a good night’s sleep, according to new international research presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2022.

The study found that suboptimal sleep was associated with a higher likelihood of heart disease and stroke.

The authors estimated that seven in ten of these cardiovascular conditions could be prevented if everyone was a good sleeper.

And while researchers homed in on the sleep behaviors of 7,200 people comprised mostly of Europeans, Americans also aren’t sleeping.

Black Americans suffer worse from short sleep or sleep apnea.

Earlier this year, the JAMA Open Network indicated that the problem continues to worsen for African Americans.

JAMA researchers discovered that Black Americans get less sleep than white people, a deficit of 15 minutes a day in childhood that grows into almost an hour in adulthood.

Additionally, an Oxford study found that far more Black and Hispanic people than white people report routinely getting less than 6 hours of sleep, well short of the recommended 7 to 9 hours for adults.

“Sleep is a privilege,” Dayna Johnson, a sleep epidemiologist at Emory University, told Science.org. “If we can target sleep, we might be able to reduce the burden of all types of diseases among racial minorities.”

Science Direct found that more than a dozen studies have identified racial discrimination as a contributor to sleep disparities.

“Black people reported more discrimination and more severe insomnia symptoms than white people, and a statistical analysis determined discrimination accounted for 60% of their insomnia severity,” researchers wrote at Science Direct.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.