Polling site at PS 375 Jackie Robinson School in Brooklyn on Election Day, Tuesday, November 3, 2020. Voting. (302654)
Credit: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office

Logo for THE CITYThis article was originally published on by THE CITY

Brooklynites cast their vote at Dodge YMCA in Boerum Hill, Nov. 2, 2021 | Hiram Alejandro Durán/ THE CITY

After a chaotic redistricting process, New York’s political boundaries have finally been set for the 2022 election season. A lot has changed. The new lines mean some congressional veterans will vie for the same seat. More than a dozen incumbents in the State Senate may be drawn out of their current districts.

To figure out how the lines impact who represents you in Washington and Albany, enter your address in the search bar below. The political boundaries shown on this map are accurate for all 2022 races. Candidates running in each new district will be updated throughout the primary season as election officials finalize ballot slates.

New York will hold a primary for governor, lieutenant governor, Assembly seats and more on June 28, with early voting starting June 18. A separate primary for the House of Representatives and State Senate will take place August 23. Look up your polling location and a sample ballot for those races with this address look-up tool from the city Board of Elections.

Results are available only for locations in New York City. Explore any district in the state using the dropdown menu, and tap or hover over the districts to see how many people in the newly drawn districts are from each replaced district.

Where did these maps come from? Every decade following the U.S. Census, states adjust their internal political boundaries to account for shifts in population.

In New York, the districts for Congress and the State Senate were created by a court-appointed special master in mid-May after a protracted legal fight. The Assembly lines were created by the Democrat-controlled state legislature after a newly-created commission charged with creating the new lines failed to do so, and split along partisan lines. In June, an appellate court declared the new Assembly map invalid as well, but said it should not be changed for the upcoming primary nor the November general election. The court ruled that the lines be redrawn before the 2024 election season.

THE CITY is an independent, nonprofit news outlet dedicated to hard-hitting reporting that serves the people of New York.

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